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Asia/Pacific Ed. 2017
North American Ed. 2017
North American Ed. 2018
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Q&A's On Ice Cream
Accelerated Shelf-life
Testing
Antifreeze Proteins
Buttermilk: Use of
Calcium Nutrient
Content Claims
Chocolate Ice Cream:
Formulating
Color in Ice Cream
Cost Management
Cost Management
Drawing Temperatures
Filtered Milks
Gelato
Gelato
Glycemic Index
"Good For You"
I/C: Formulation
Hybrid Products
Ice Cream as
Functional Food
Ice Cream:
Gumminess
Ice Cream Inclusions
Ice Cream: Shelf Life
Ice Cream Sweetness
Ingredients Cost
Savings
Lactose Reduction
Line Cost Averaging
Low Carb
Ice Cream
Low Carb
I/C: Formulation
Low Temperature
Processes
Meltdown Behavior
Mix Aging
Mix Composition:
Effect on Flavor
Mix Processing
Variables
No Sugar-Added
Ice Cream
Novelties:
Adding Inclusions
Novelties:
Preventing Soggy
Cones & Wafers
Nutmeats
Pasteurization,
Homogenization
Premium Light
Ice Cream
Prevention of Coarse
Texture
Prevention of Fat
Accumulation
Sensory Evaluation-
QA/Product
Development
Sucrose Replacement
Sweeteners: Blending
Sweeteners:
Considerations
Vanilla Crisis I
Vanilla Crisis II
Visual Defects:
Pink Discolouration
Visual Defects:
White Particles
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Questions & Answers
from "On Ice Cream" featured in Dairy Foods magazine
and sourced from "On Ice Cream" technical short courses.


Ice Cream Sweetness:

Question: How sweet should ice cream be? Can it be measured?

Answer: Sweetness depends on mix specifics (including how the mix is to be used), flavor(s) to be executed, the sweetener system(s) available, and conditions of consumption. Most ice creams will try to achieve the equivalence of 13-17% sucrose. Chocolate ice creams normally require higher sweetness levels to offset the harshness of the cocoas used. Fruit flavors may require more or less sweetness to more appropriately deliver flavor quality. Additionally, products such as fat modified ice creams, sherbert, sorbet, and water ices, have their own sweetness (and sweetener) concerns and objectives. Sweetness can be achieved by using blends of a variety of sweeteners (e.g., sucrose, HFCS, regular corn syrup) to achieve similar "theoretical" sweetness to a 100% sucrose formula. It provides a simple means of measuring the sweetness differences between mixes. "Theoretical" sweetness is calculated by taking the theoretical sweetness (in ice cream) of an individual sweetener relative to sucrose (typically given a value of "1") and multiplying this by the use rate in the mix. The sum of all such calculations for all sweeteners used is the "theoretical" sweetness of the mix. When comparing "theoretical" sweetness between mixes to be used for the same purpose, values that exceed +/-0.5 "theoretical" sweetness should be considered different and measures taken to modify the amount or type of sweetener(s) to more closely compare your sweetness objective.


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