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North American Ed. 2016
Asia/Pacific Ed. 2017
North American Ed. 2017
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Q&A's On Ice Cream
Accelerated Shelf-life
Testing
Antifreeze Proteins
Buttermilk: Use of
Calcium Nutrient
Content Claims
Chocolate Ice Cream:
Formulating
Color in Ice Cream
Cost Management
Cost Management
Drawing Temperatures
Filtered Milks
Gelato
Gelato
Glycemic Index
"Good For You"
I/C: Formulation
Hybrid Products
Ice Cream as
Functional Food
Ice Cream:
Gumminess
Ice Cream Inclusions
Ice Cream: Shelf Life
Ice Cream Sweetness
Ingredients Cost
Savings
Lactose Reduction
Line Cost Averaging
Low Carb
Ice Cream
Low Carb
I/C: Formulation
Low Temperature
Processes
Meltdown Behavior
Mix Aging
Mix Composition:
Effect on Flavor
Mix Processing
Variables
No Sugar-Added
Ice Cream
Novelties:
Adding Inclusions
Novelties:
Preventing Soggy
Cones & Wafers
Nutmeats
Pasteurization,
Homogenization
Premium Light
Ice Cream
Prevention of Coarse
Texture
Prevention of Fat
Accumulation
Sensory Evaluation-
QA/Product
Development
Sucrose Replacement
Sweeteners: Blending
Sweeteners:
Considerations
Vanilla Crisis I
Vanilla Crisis II
Visual Defects:
Pink Discolouration
Visual Defects:
White Particles
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Questions & Answers
from "On Ice Cream" featured in Dairy Foods magazine
and sourced from "On Ice Cream" technical short courses.


Lactose Reduction:

Question: What are the key considerations affecting formulation of lactose reduced or lactose free frozen dairy desserts?

Answer: Define your objective either to eliminate lactose crystallization (i.e., "sandiness") or develop true lactose free products. In the former case, the occurrence of the "sandy" defect can be eliminated or reduced by managing lactose content through mix composition. In the latter case, however, it is first necessary to identify a market need. This is still controversial even in markets where incidence of lactose intolerance is supposed to be greatest. Given such a market, several approaches can be taken. One is to simply create products that are truly "non-dairy". These are frozen desserts based on non-dairy proteins (inherently lactose free) and fats. A second approach is to use dairy ingredients such as milk protein concentrates and isolates that have their lactose content reduced by ultrafiltration or similar processes. Note that not all (or enough) lactose may be removed during these processes. Finally, the hydrolysis of lactose by lactase enzyme might have value. Under proper conditions, 99+% of the lactose can be hydrolyzed. In these latter two instances, care is necessary to develop mix formulas to match your objectives for firmness, freezing performance, and sweetness. In either case, increased levels of "lactose modified" milk-solids-not-fat can lead to some truly novel new product concepts.


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