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North American Ed. 2016
Asia/Pacific Ed. 2017
North American Ed. 2017
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Q&A's On Ice Cream
Accelerated Shelf-life
Testing
Antifreeze Proteins
Buttermilk: Use of
Calcium Nutrient
Content Claims
Chocolate Ice Cream:
Formulating
Color in Ice Cream
Cost Management
Cost Management
Drawing Temperatures
Filtered Milks
Gelato
Gelato
Glycemic Index
"Good For You"
I/C: Formulation
Hybrid Products
Ice Cream as
Functional Food
Ice Cream:
Gumminess
Ice Cream Inclusions
Ice Cream: Shelf Life
Ice Cream Sweetness
Ingredients Cost
Savings
Lactose Reduction
Line Cost Averaging
Low Carb
Ice Cream
Low Carb
I/C: Formulation
Low Temperature
Processes
Meltdown Behavior
Mix Aging
Mix Composition:
Effect on Flavor
Mix Processing
Variables
No Sugar-Added
Ice Cream
Novelties:
Adding Inclusions
Novelties:
Preventing Soggy
Cones & Wafers
Nutmeats
Pasteurization,
Homogenization
Premium Light
Ice Cream
Prevention of Coarse
Texture
Prevention of Fat
Accumulation
Sensory Evaluation-
QA/Product
Development
Sucrose Replacement
Sweeteners: Blending
Sweeteners:
Considerations
Vanilla Crisis I
Vanilla Crisis II
Visual Defects:
Pink Discolouration
Visual Defects:
White Particles
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Questions & Answers
from "On Ice Cream" featured in Dairy Foods magazine
and sourced from "On Ice Cream" technical short courses.


Prevention of Sogginess in Cones & Wafers:

Question: Is there a way to treat sandwich wafers and cones to prevent them from getting soggy?

Answer: The migration of moisture into an unprotected, low moisture, hard baked item, like a cone or a sandwich wafer, from the unfrozen portion of ice cream with it comes into contact is unavoidable.
Protection against moisture migration can be provided by coating the contact surface with a material impervious to water (e.g., chocolate or fat/oil coatings), yet compatible with desirable eating qualities.

In the case of cones, this is accomplished effectively by spraying a thin film of a chocolate coating inside the cone shortly before it is filled. This however will change the eating quality of the cone.

It is impractical to do coat sandwich wafers inline and limitations of logistics and cost work against the use of pre-coated wafers. In addition, the presence of pre-coating would likely make it necessary to change the methods of handling the wafers possibly reducing throughput and increasing breakage. The industry has more or less accepted the idea that in order to maintain cost parameters (with respect to wafer cost, handling and throughput), it is inevitable that wafers become soggy within a few days of manufacture.

Apparently consumers accept this condition as normal, as the sales volumes for ice cream sandwiches seem not to be affected by this apparent defect. Further, a crisp, stiff wafer can have problems as well causing ice cream to slip from between the wafers during eating. Thus, a crisp, dry wafer may not be totally necessary or desirable.


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